Local Stories

Philadelphia, PA – Rosenbluth International has imposed across-the-board employee pay reductions as a result of a severe slump in travel due to last week's terrorists attacks.

A spokesperson for the international travel management company in Philadelphia declined to say how large the pay cuts were or what other measures the company has taken. Rosenbluth has more than 5,000 employees in 24 countries including several offices in North Dakota.

Bismarck, ND – If you drive in the North Dakota Capitol's north lot, you may see a strange car in the Governor's assigned parking spot.

Gone is the black Buick with the "1" license plate. Instead, you'll see a state fleet car -- marked by the "SF" on the license plate.

So, Governor Hoeven, what's the deal?

Bismarck, ND – Amtrak has seen a huge increase in customers in the past week.

This is Amtrak spokesperson Karina Van Veen:

Fargo, ND – It is impossible to see the devastation caused by the recent tragedies in New York and Washington without wanting to help the victims and their families. As many charities and nonprofit organizations are springing into action to collect food, water money, and other supplies to assist the victims. The generous people of North Dakota will want to do their part to help.

But keep in mind that, unfortunately, this time of need is also a time of prey for scam artists.

Bismarck, ND – The staff of the North Dakota Public Service Commission says Montana Dakota Utilities is making too much money in its electric division...and wants MDU to lower its rates by 11-percent.

The staff report says MDU has exceeded its agreed-to rate of return on electricity. MDU spokesman Dan Sharp says the utility made more money than expected - because it's been able to sell power on the spot market.

Fargo, ND – The American Red Cross is recruiting volunteers with law enforcement backgrounds only to assist with safety and security concerns in New York City and Washington D.C.

Executive Director of the Minn-Kota Chapter of the American Red Cross, Kathy Schons says these volunteers will act as liaisons with the law enforcement community.

Bismarck, ND – Travel agents in North Dakota say commercial air travel will climb again -- perhaps even getting back to more normal levels.

Just how air travelers would react remains to be seen as airlines resumed flights after last week's terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington D.C.

Travel agency owner Katherine Satrom in Bismarck says she is optimistic:

Bismarck, ND – Travel agents in North Dakota say they're optimistic that commercial air travel eventually will climb again.

Dickinson travel agency owner Craig Steve says some people will be leery of flying, but others will gain confidence from increased security measures. He says he's worried about too much government intervention in the airline industry.

Fargo, ND – North Dakota State University will hold a public forum "Perspectives: Attack on America" to discuss the implications of last week's terrorist attacks on the United States.

The forum will start at noon, Wednesday September 19, and be held in the Memorial Union Gallery. Panel members will share their expertise on terrorism.

Panel members will include NDSU professors Robert Wood, associate professor and chair of political science, and John Helgeland, professor of religion and history.

    Bismarck, ND – Most North Dakota Farmers Union members who were in Washington, D.C. last week to lobby for a new farm bill returned home via bus.

    But Dale Enerson of Stanley got home another way.

    "I got a plane ticket and got out of Baltimore Saturday afternoon and got back to Minot Saturday night."

    Enerson was scheduled to return home Wednesday -- but the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington disrupted air service. He says most of the other Farmers Union members chartered a bus to get back to North Dakota.

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    News from NPR

    Days after the Trump administration agreed to restore Chinese telecom firm ZTE's access to its U.S. parts suppliers, a bipartisan group moved to block the deal.

    An amendment sponsored by Sens. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., and Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., added language to the National Defense Authorization Act to reinstate a ban on ZTE buying U.S. components. That sanction was put in place after the Chinese company violated the terms of an earlier agreement to punish it for illegal sales to Iran and North Korea.

    Why Was Singapore Chosen To Host The Summit?

    2 hours ago

    The Trump-Kim summit is the first between a sitting U.S. president and a North Korean leader. But how did it come to be held in Singapore?

    In the weeks leading up to the meeting, several locations were considered: the Korean Demilitarized Zone, or DMZ, the border barrier that separates North and South Korea; Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia; Geneva, Switzerland; and Stockholm, Sweden.

    However, it was Singapore, a city-state of five million people at the tip of the Malaysian peninsula, that quickly emerged as the top choice.

    Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

    ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

    Dorothy Cotton, a leader in the civil rights movement who educated thousands of African-Americans about their rights and the power of organizing, has died at 88.

    She died at a retirement community in Ithaca, N.Y., the Ithaca Journal reports. The Southern Christian Leadership Conference confirmed her death to the Associated Press.

    Updated at 11:19 p.m. ET

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions is imposing sharp new limits on who can get asylum in the United States, ruling in a closely watched case that most migrants fleeing domestic abuse or gang violence will not qualify.

    "Asylum was never meant to alleviate all problems — even all serious problems — that people face every day all over the world," Sessions said on Monday in a speech before immigration judges in Virginia.

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    Main Street

    "Alex not Amy, Growing up Transgender in the Rural West" ~ Teacher Olivia Becker

    Monday, June 11 – Today we share a compelling documentary from Montana Public Radio titled “Alex not Amy – Growing up transgender in the rural West.” Producer Denise Dowling shares the story of ten-year-old Alex O'Neill, who knew since he was a toddler that he's a boy, despite being assigned female at birth. The documentary follows his transition as he changes his legal and social gender. The piece explores the various laws, identification policies, school and sports guidelines regarding...

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