Local Stories

Philadelphia, PA – Rosenbluth International has imposed across-the-board employee pay reductions as a result of a severe slump in travel due to last week's terrorists attacks.

A spokesperson for the international travel management company in Philadelphia declined to say how large the pay cuts were or what other measures the company has taken. Rosenbluth has more than 5,000 employees in 24 countries including several offices in North Dakota.

Bismarck, ND – If you drive in the North Dakota Capitol's north lot, you may see a strange car in the Governor's assigned parking spot.

Gone is the black Buick with the "1" license plate. Instead, you'll see a state fleet car -- marked by the "SF" on the license plate.

So, Governor Hoeven, what's the deal?

Bismarck, ND – Amtrak has seen a huge increase in customers in the past week.

This is Amtrak spokesperson Karina Van Veen:

Fargo, ND – It is impossible to see the devastation caused by the recent tragedies in New York and Washington without wanting to help the victims and their families. As many charities and nonprofit organizations are springing into action to collect food, water money, and other supplies to assist the victims. The generous people of North Dakota will want to do their part to help.

But keep in mind that, unfortunately, this time of need is also a time of prey for scam artists.

Bismarck, ND – The staff of the North Dakota Public Service Commission says Montana Dakota Utilities is making too much money in its electric division...and wants MDU to lower its rates by 11-percent.

The staff report says MDU has exceeded its agreed-to rate of return on electricity. MDU spokesman Dan Sharp says the utility made more money than expected - because it's been able to sell power on the spot market.

Fargo, ND – The American Red Cross is recruiting volunteers with law enforcement backgrounds only to assist with safety and security concerns in New York City and Washington D.C.

Executive Director of the Minn-Kota Chapter of the American Red Cross, Kathy Schons says these volunteers will act as liaisons with the law enforcement community.

Bismarck, ND – Travel agents in North Dakota say commercial air travel will climb again -- perhaps even getting back to more normal levels.

Just how air travelers would react remains to be seen as airlines resumed flights after last week's terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington D.C.

Travel agency owner Katherine Satrom in Bismarck says she is optimistic:

Bismarck, ND – Travel agents in North Dakota say they're optimistic that commercial air travel eventually will climb again.

Dickinson travel agency owner Craig Steve says some people will be leery of flying, but others will gain confidence from increased security measures. He says he's worried about too much government intervention in the airline industry.

Fargo, ND – North Dakota State University will hold a public forum "Perspectives: Attack on America" to discuss the implications of last week's terrorist attacks on the United States.

The forum will start at noon, Wednesday September 19, and be held in the Memorial Union Gallery. Panel members will share their expertise on terrorism.

Panel members will include NDSU professors Robert Wood, associate professor and chair of political science, and John Helgeland, professor of religion and history.

    Bismarck, ND – Most North Dakota Farmers Union members who were in Washington, D.C. last week to lobby for a new farm bill returned home via bus.

    But Dale Enerson of Stanley got home another way.

    "I got a plane ticket and got out of Baltimore Saturday afternoon and got back to Minot Saturday night."

    Enerson was scheduled to return home Wednesday -- but the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington disrupted air service. He says most of the other Farmers Union members chartered a bus to get back to North Dakota.

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    News from NPR

    Scientists have uncovered a pit of human bones at a Civil War battlefield in Virginia. The remains are the amputated limbs of wounded Union soldiers.

    It's the first "limb pit" from a Civil War battlefield to be excavated, and experts say it opens a new window on what is often overlooked in Civil War history: the aftermath of battle, the agony of survivors and the trials of early combat surgeons.

    The order came in April. China's government instructed farmers in the country's northeastern breadbasket region to grow more soybeans, calling it "a political priority."

    But soybean fields lay empty in the village of Sandaogou, which means "Three Ditches," in Liaoning province. It has been a dry spring.

    "We've had a drought this year, so we planted soybeans late. The seedlings should be out by now. We need more rain," says farmer Liu, who only gives her surname for fear of trouble with local authorities. Soy, after all, has become "political."

    A recording of migrant children crying for their mothers and fathers has gripped the nation — and ratcheted up the debate over the Trump administration's policy of separating families at the border.

    In a video posted to Twitter Monday, the president of France tore into a teenager who called him 'Manu,' a common nickname for Emmanuel in French, during an event at a World War II memorial.

    Instead of shaking the boy's hand, or taking a selfie — as he did with other crowd members, Macron proceeded to reprimand him.

    "Call me 'M. President of the Republic' or 'Sir'," Macron said in the video.

    He also tweeted his disapproval citing the boy's lack of respect.

    A senior FBI official who has come under fire for sending politically charged text messages while working on the Hillary Clinton email investigation and the Trump-Russia probe has been escorted out of the FBI building.

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    Main Street

    Psychologist Michael Rosmann ~ 4-Day School Weeks ~ Storycorps

    Tuesday, June 19 – Agricultural producers can face serious stress, especially when commodity prices are low. It increases their vulnerability to anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and occasionally but infrequently, even suicide. Today we visit with psychologist Michael Rosmann, who has recently been writing about behavioral health in his column, which appears in several rural publications. ~~~ The Alexander Public School District made a bold decision this spring, moving to a 4-day school...

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