Dakota Datebook

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Sitting Bull to Phil Jackson, cattle to prairie dogs, knoefla to lefse.  In partnership with the Historical Society of North Dakota, and funded by the North Dakota Humanities Council, a nonprofit, independent state partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the program do not necessarily reflect those of the North Dakota Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities. Find the 2003-2017 archives here.

Dakota Datebook is is generously funded by the North Dakota Humanities Council, a nonprofit, independent state partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the program do not necessarily reflect those of the North Dakota Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

A Peculiar Accident

8 hours ago

 

Mail Order Houses

Feb 22, 2018

 

 

George W. Lynn didn’t want the newest town in Emmons County to be named after him, but he found peace with the “Lynn Town” derivative, Linton.  Lynn was Emmons County’s first state’s attorney, and also a farmer and newspaper publisher. In the 1898 election, the town of Linton won out over Williamsport to be the county seat. Linton was also a hub as a double end point for the Milwaukee and Northern Pacific railroads. On this date in 1899, Linton’s post office was established.

 

In February of 1918, residents of Crosby had a lot to celebrate; they were dedicating the new Divide County Courthouse. The building was given its formal housewarming on this date.

 

 

The history of “wild-west” Medora makes up one of North Dakota’s best stories with its intimate connections to Theodore Roosevelt, the Marquis de Mores, the Badlands, cattle herds, and the National Grasslands.

 

The town is the heart of Billings County; in fact, Medora has been the county seat since 1886.  Tourists who visit Medora routinely drive past the Billings County courthouse, a beautiful red-brick modernistic building.

 

 

Three miles east of the Montana border is Golva, one of North Dakota’s youngest towns. Like other communities across the state, Golva has its roots in the railroad. The site of Golva was considered for a town as early as 1913. When the Northern Pacific Railroad arrived at the site in 1915, a station was established – finished the next year with the help of horses, mules and wagons.

 

With the North Dakota boys manning the trenches on the front lines on this date in 1918, local newspapers were carefully scrutinized, hoping that the name of a loved one would not appear on the latest causality list.  

 

James Scofield

Feb 13, 2018

 

 

On this date in 1929, residents of Ward County mourned the loss of James H. Scofield, a long time resident and pioneer of the state. He passed away just a few days earlier from a heart condition, following a bout with influenza, marking the end of a prosperous and varied life.

 

 

 

On this date in 1915, the Washburn Leader printed an extensive article about the state of child labor in North Dakota. The article summarized a presentation by Dr. J.M. Gillette of the University of North Dakota. Besides being a sociology professor, Gillette was chairman of North Dakota’s Child Labor Committee and a member of the Advisory Committee on National Child Labor.

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