Carbon Capture

Amy Sisk / Inside Energy

With the Clean Power Plan out, officials in North Dakota say they are still committed to finding ways to capture carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants.

They’re eyeing a project under construction in Texas to build a zero-emission gas plant, a small-scale version of the Allam Cycle outside Houston that’s slated to fire up next year.

Amy Sisk / Prairie Public

North Dakota’s lignite coal industry has ambitious -- and pricey -- plans to capture carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants, which industry leaders highlighted Thursday at a conference in Bismarck.

Amy Sisk / Inside Energy

Coal state lawmakers want to make cleaning up coal more economically attractive. A bipartisan group of lawmakers announced Wednesday they are re-introducing a bill to expand tax credits for projects to capture carbon dioxide.

The coal industry faces a big problem in cleaning up emissions: cost. It’s often a barrier to moving clean coal technology out of the research stage and getting it to work on a commercial scale.

Amy Sisk / Inside Energy

 

 

If the coal industry is to survive, its savior may be something often touted by President Donald Trump when he talks energy.

“We’re going to have clean coal, really clean coal,” he said earlier this year in announcing an executive order to roll back the emission-targeting Clean Power Plan.

Courtesy EERC

An ethanol producer with a plant at Richardton will be working with the Energy and Environmental Research Center on a carbon capture project.

The Industrial Commission has awarded the project $490,000. That's half the projected $980,000 cost.

"When you make ethanol, it comes with a "CI" value, a carbon-intensity value," said Dustin Willett, the chief operating officer of Red Trail Energy. "The lower the "CI" value, the better it is for the earth, as well as from a marketing standpoint."

The CO@ comes from the ethanol fermenters at the plant.

PSC officially weigs in on proposed EPA carbon rule

Nov 26, 2014

The North Dakota Public Service Commission is officially weighing in on the EPA’s proposed rules to cut carbon emissions.

The rule says the US needs to reduce carbon emissions 30 percent by the year 2030. North Dakota would be required to reduce emissions 11 percent.

Commission chairman Brian Kalk says the PSC response comes down to three major topics.

Utilities weighing in on proposed EPA carbon rules

Nov 10, 2014

Utilities and coal companies are working to make sure they meet a December first deadline to comment on the proposed carbon emission reduction rule, proposed by the EPA.

The rule calls for a 30 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions by the year 2030.

"We are busily trying to put comments together," said Basin Electric Power Cooperative CEO and general manager Paul Sukut. "We are working with our membership as well."

Sukut says Basin’s concerned about how this will work – when the targets for the individual states are different.

EPA carbon rule comment dedline looms

Nov 4, 2014

The deadline for comments on the new EPA carbon emissions rule is approaching.

The EPA extended the deadline until December first.

The rule would reduce carbon emissions 30 percent by the year 2030. In North Dakota, the reduction would be 11 percent.

Coal and power companies are weighing in – and some are planning to add comments to what they’ve already said.

Members of the North Dakota Public Service Commission say one of the potential effects of the Obama Administration’s proposed carbon emission rule is that the rural electric cooperatives would come under the PSC’s jurisdiction.

The rules are meant to cut CO2 emissions 30 percent by the year 2030.

The EPA is holding hearings in four cities across the country on the proposed new rules to cut carbon emissions.

The rules call for a 30 percent reduction in carbon emissions by 2030.

One of the hearings will be held in Denver. 

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