Dakota Access Pipeline

Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

The Public Service Commission and the owners of the Dakota Access Pipeline have reached a settlement over some reported problems with the company following the siting permit the PSC issued for the pipeline.

The problems included taking out more trees and shrubs along the route than outlined in the permit. Also, Energy Transfer Partners re-routed a part of the line away from cultural resources. The company notified the State Historic Preservation Office, but did not tell the PSC.

PSC continuing negotiations with DAPL owners

Sep 11, 2017
Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

Negotiations continue between legal staff at the North Dakota Public Service Commission and the owners of the Dakota Access pipeline over what could be violations of the pipeline’s siting permit.

There are two areas of concern. One is the company’s rerouting of a portion of the pipeline to avoid culturally sensitive areas. The other is the company clearing more trees and brush along the pipeline route than it was authorized to do.  Both were done without PSC approval.

A hearing had been scheduled on the re-route – but was postponed to allow the negotiations to take place.

Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

Attorneys for the North Dakota Public Service Commission and the owners of the Dakota Access Pipeline will be meeting again to try and work out a settlement on a number of issues raised by the PSC.

It is alleged Energy Transfer Partners violated some of the terms of its siting agreement with the PSC. One deals with the company clearing away more trees and brush than allowed in the permit. Another deals with a re-route of the pipeline around culturally significant areas. It’s alleged the company did the re-route without notifying the PSC.

Amy Sisk / Inside Energy

The company behind the Dakota Access Pipeline has filed a federal lawsuit against Greenpeace and other groups it claims conspired against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Energy Transfer Partners says these groups spread false information about the company and pipeline project to raise donations. The pipeline developer claims they planted and funded "eco-terrorists."

Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

The Public Service Commission has set a new date for an “investigative hearing” on what could be a violation of the siting approval issued to the Dakota Access Pipeline.

A third party construction inspector says the pipeline’s builders removed more trees and shrubs than they should have, under the terms of the siting permit. A hearing was to be held Thursday. But the company asked for some time to work out a settlement with PSC staffers –and the Commission earlier voted 2-1 to grant an extension.

PSC postpones hearing on DAPL

Aug 15, 2017
Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

On a 2 to 1 vote, the Public Service Commission has agreed to postpone Thursday’s hearing with the owners of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

A construction consultant says Energy Transfer Partners cleared more trees and brush than allowed in the pipeline’s siting permit. The Thursday hearing was billed as an “investigative” hearing, to look further into the matter and see if a complaint needed to be issued.

The company sent a letter to the Commission, saying it would be willing to work on a resolution of the case before it would get to a formal hearings. And the PSC agreed.

Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

The Public Service Commission has made a settlement offer to the owners of the Dakota Access Pipeline in a case where the company didn’t tell the Commission is was re-routing the pipeline until after that re-route was done.

Energy Transfer Partners made an unanticipated cultural resource discovery. Under the siting permit, the PSC was to have been told about such finds, and the PSC would vote on the re-route. That wasn’t done. And the PSC issued an “order to show cause” to the company.

Dakota Access Pipeline Upends Oil Transport

Aug 14, 2017
Amy Sisk / Inside Energy

After months of protest, legal wrangling and stalled construction, the Dakota Access Pipeline is up and running -- and transforming how oil leaves North Dakota.

The pipeline became operational June 1, offering North Dakota for the first time more than enough room to carry its oil to market on pipelines.

New data released by the state show the line’s impact: Pipelines now transport more than three-quarters of North Dakota’s oil.

PSC holding DAPL hearing Thursday

Aug 14, 2017
PSC

On Thursday, the North Dakota Public Service Commission is holding a hearing on issues raised by a third-party construction company – hired to monitor the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The third-party company is concerned that Energy Transfer Partners – the builder of the Dakota Access Pipeline – cleared too many trees in up to 80 different locations along the right-of-way.

Commissioner Julie Fedorchak said the Commission typically allows 50 feet of right of way to be cleared along a pipeline route.

PSC

The Public Service Commission will hold a hearing next week concerning alleged siting permit violations by the builders of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The hearing will deal with the company clearing more trees and shrubs than authorized.

A second violation concerns a re-route of the pipeline to avoid “culturally significant” areas. The company did the reroute without notifying the PSC. And the Commission has filed a formal complaint about it.

Pages