ethics

ND Catholic Conference: No on Measures 1, 3

Oct 6, 2018

The North Dakota Catholic Conference is the latest organization to oppose Measure One on the November ballot.

That measure would create a state ethics commission, would require more transparency in donations, restrict gifts to elected officials from lobbyists, and prevents officials from becoming lobbyists for two years after leaving state government. It's a proposed amendment to the state's Constitution.

"This is a difficult issue for us," said Conference executive director Christopher Dodson. "No one's opposed to integrity."

'Ethics measure' will be on the Nov. ballot in ND

Jul 25, 2018

The “North Dakota Anti-Corruption” Constitutional amendment will be on the November ballot.

Secretary of State Al Jaeger has certified the measure. The group “North Dakotans for Public Integrity” needed 26,904 valid signatures to get the measure on the ballot. Jaeger accepted 36,849 signatures as valid.

"We are now in the process of developing strategies to make sure voters throughout the state are well aware of this measure," said group vice-president Ellen Chaffee. "It's a great opportunity to inject some common sense accountability in how state government operates."

Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

Members of the group “North Dakotans for Public Integrity” submitted petitions Monday to place what the group calls the "Anti-Corruption Amendment" to the state Constitution on the November ballot.

The group needed 26,904 valid signatures to get the measure on the ballot.

"I'm honored to announce that over 38,000 petitioners are on the record to place the North Dakota Anti-Corruption amendment on the November ballot," the group's co-chair, Ellen Chaffee, told a rally on the state Capitol steps in Bismarck.

Ethics proposal shot down in ND House

Mar 17, 2015

The state House has turned down a proposed Constitutional amendment that – if voters would approve – would create a state ethics commission.

If it were okayed at the ballot box, the 2017 Legislature would have written the rules for the commission.

Opponents say the state doesn't need it.