Dakota Datebook | Prairie Public Broadcasting

Dakota Datebook

6:42 am, 8:42 am, 3:50 pm*, 5:44 pm, and 7:50 pm* CT
  • Hosted by Prairie Public

Sitting Bull to Phil Jackson, cattle to prairie dogs, knoefla to lefse. Dakota Datebook radio features air weekdays at 6:42 am, 8:42 am, 3:50 pm*, 5:44 pm, and 7:50 pm* CT on Prairie Public. Find the 2003-2017 archives here.

*These airtimes during Main Street may vary.

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Dakota Datebook is generously funded by the North Dakota Humanities Council, a nonprofit, independent state partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the program do not necessarily reflect those of the North Dakota Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

John Pickler

Jan 24, 2018

 

After North and South Dakota became states, everyone from Dakota homesteaders to congressmen wanted to know: Where was the boundary? They knew it was the seventh standard parallel, but where exactly was that?

Special Session

Jan 23, 2018

 

Citing extraordinary conditions unparalleled in the history or our country, and a need to secure sufficient seed and feed for maximum agriculture production, Governor Lynn J. Frazier called for a Special Legislative Session on this date in 1918.

Paha Sapa

Jan 22, 2018

 


On this date in 1915, the Sioux County Pioneer reported on a meeting at Fort Yates. The ten members of the permanent committee representing the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation gathered to discuss the matter of Paha Sapa, the Black Hills.

German Editors

Jan 19, 2018

 


John Paul Gross was a newspaper editor who worked at the Staats-Press, a German newspaper in Fargo from 1902 to 1907.  In 1907 he moved to Adams County and established the State-Line Herald, at Lemmon.

Dakota Judges

Jan 18, 2018

Dakota Territory boomed in the 1880s. In ten years, the population more than quadrupled to 600,000 people. This brought a need for more services, like the courts.  

 

Which Allied aircraft during World War 2 did the German soldier fear the most?  The fighters?  The heavy bombers? 

 


Women have been serving as police officers for more than a century in the United States. While the earliest of these women is not known, there are records that show a Marie Owens on duty with the Chicago Police Department in the 1890s.

 


James J. Hill is a big name in the railroading history of the Great Plains, earning his nickname “The Empire Builder.”  In 1878, Hill teamed up with several other investors to purchase the financially ailing St. Paul and Pacific Railroad, which was renamed the Great Northern Railway.

 


The United States Postal Service has a long history stretching back over two centuries, to when Benjamin Franklin became the first Postmaster General. By 1863, door-to-door delivery was established where the income could cover the cost; prior to that, a person had to pick up their mail at the post office.

 

Life in McKenzie County was a new experience for the Reverend Richard C. Jahn. The twenty-year-old seminary student had answered a call for a minister from Schafer, North Dakota in the fall of 1915. He traveled by train from Missouri to reach his new post by November, and found lodging with a bachelor homesteader in a cabin about twenty miles east of Watford City.

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