Dakota Access Pipeline | Prairie Public Broadcasting

Dakota Access Pipeline

The North Dakota Public Service Commission has scheduled a formal hearing on Energy Transfer Partners’ plan to double the capacity of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The pipeline capacity would go from 500,000 barrels a day to 1.1 million barrels a day. The company plans to do that by adding five compressors. They would be built in Emmons County. And that’s why the hearing will be held in Linton Nov. 13th.

The commission received a number of comments, asking for the formal hearing. Commissioner Randy Christmann weighed-in on what the hearing will not be about.

PSC looking at Dakota Access capacity plans

Jul 11, 2019
Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

The developers of the Dakota Access Pipeline are taking the next step in expanding the pipeline’s capacity.

The current capacity is 500,000 barrels of oil a day.

Energy Transfer Partners has now applied to the North Dakota Public Service Commission to site a new pumping station in Emmons County, west of Linton.

"It will consist of five 6,000 horsepower electric motors and pumps," said Commissioner Julie Fedorchak. "It will allow for pipeline transportation of up to 1.1 million barrels of crude oil per day.

When the Legislature gavels in Thursday, it will spend that day listening to speeches.

Chief Justice Gerald Vandewalle will give the “State of the Judiciary” address Thursday morning, followed by a Tribal representative giving the “State of the Relationship” talk following that. In the afternoon, lawmakers will hear Gov. Doug Burgum’s “State of the State” address.

It’s a change in tradition, because normally, those speeches would be given on different days.

Amy Sisk

A photo taken of the Dakota Access Pipeline protest site by former Prairie Public and Inside Energy Reporter Amy Sisk has become part of a US House committee’s investigation into Russian meddling into US politics.

Sisk saw her photo as part of a Washington Post article on Russian trolls trying to influence the debate over climate change and DAPL.

"As I was scrolling through this article, I came across a photo that I realized I had taken," Sisk said. "Apparently, Russian trolls had taken a photo that I took and turned it into propaganda and a social media post."

Amy Sisk / Inside Energy

A federal judge has ruled the Dakota Access Pipeline can continue operations while the Army Corps of Engineers updates its environmental analysis.

Earlier this summer, judge James Boasberg found that the Corps fell short in analyzing the impact of a potential oil spill on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation and its residents.

Amy Sisk / Inside Energy

The Dakota Access Pipeline is raising the price of Bakken crude and making it more competitive with other shale plays, according to North Dakota officials.

For years, the state’s remote location hurt Bakken producers.

It cost a lot to ship the state’s crude hundreds of miles to market on trains, compared to oil from places like Texas that doesn’t have to travel far to refineries along the Gulf Coast.

DAPL costs still being tallied

Sep 26, 2017
Amy Sisk / Prairie Public

Bills continue to come in for costs incurred by the Dakota Access Pipeline protest.

The state’s Emergency Commission has approved another $5 million in borrowing authority from the state-owned Bank of North Dakota to cover the costs. That puts the amount of borrowing authority at over $40 million.

Meanwhile, that commission has given its OK to receive $10 million in federal grant funds for the DAPL protest. That money will be used to pay back the Bank for loans.

Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

The Public Service Commission and the owners of the Dakota Access Pipeline have reached a settlement over some reported problems with the company following the siting permit the PSC issued for the pipeline.

The problems included taking out more trees and shrubs along the route than outlined in the permit. Also, Energy Transfer Partners re-routed a part of the line away from cultural resources. The company notified the State Historic Preservation Office, but did not tell the PSC.

PSC continuing negotiations with DAPL owners

Sep 11, 2017
Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

Negotiations continue between legal staff at the North Dakota Public Service Commission and the owners of the Dakota Access pipeline over what could be violations of the pipeline’s siting permit.

There are two areas of concern. One is the company’s rerouting of a portion of the pipeline to avoid culturally sensitive areas. The other is the company clearing more trees and brush along the pipeline route than it was authorized to do.  Both were done without PSC approval.

A hearing had been scheduled on the re-route – but was postponed to allow the negotiations to take place.

Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

Attorneys for the North Dakota Public Service Commission and the owners of the Dakota Access Pipeline will be meeting again to try and work out a settlement on a number of issues raised by the PSC.

It is alleged Energy Transfer Partners violated some of the terms of its siting agreement with the PSC. One deals with the company clearing away more trees and brush than allowed in the permit. Another deals with a re-route of the pipeline around culturally significant areas. It’s alleged the company did the re-route without notifying the PSC.

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