Dakota Access Pipeline | Prairie Public Broadcasting

Dakota Access Pipeline

Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

The North Dakota Public Service Commission will hold hearings on what PSC staff allege is violations of the siting permit issued to the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The hearings will deal with the company clearing more trees and shrubs than authorized, as well as a re-route of a section of the line without telling the PSC about the re-route.

Commissioner Julie Fedorchak said the potential violations were found by a third-party contractor, hired to inspect the pipeline's construction.

Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

A North Dakota Public Service Commissioner is joining a national conversation about infrastructure development in the wake of the controversies and protests of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Julie Fedorchak said she was approached at a recent meeting in Louisiana to participate in this effort. Fedorchak said the protests will likely be a “new normal” when it comes to infrastructure development.

ND Joint Information Center

State officials say the Oceti Sakowin protest camp onn the Cannonball River south of Mandan has finally been cleared.

The deadline for protesters to leave the camp was Wednesday at 2 pm – but a number of people stayed. Thursday morning, law enforcement officers told those remaining to disperse and head south to avoid arrest. Some complied – but 46 were arrested.

“We’re feel very good about the fact that now we can have full access to continue the clean-up work we’ve been initiating the last couple of weeks,”  said Gov. Doug Burgum in an interview with Prairie Public.

Oceti Sakowin protest camp clean up could take a while

Feb 23, 2017
Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

State and federal officials are now focusing on cleaning up the area where the main Dakota Access Pipeline protest camp was located.

It’s along the Cannonball River, on Army Corps of Engineers land north of the Standing Rock Reservation.

Crews have been working to clean up the debris. They’re dismantling structures, hauling out abandoned cars and filling dumpsters with garbage.

"This isn't just high school kids picking up garbage in a ditch along teh road," Gov. Doug Burgum  told reporters at a Mandan news conference.

Oceti Sakowin protest camp clean up could take a while

Feb 23, 2017
Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

State and federal officials are now focusing on cleaning up the area where the main Dakota Access Pipeline protest camp was located.

It’s along the Cannonball River, on Army Corps of Engineers land north of the Standing Rock Reservation.

Crews have been working to clean up the debris. They’re dismantling structures, hauling out abandoned cars and filling dumpsters with garbage.

"This isn't just high school kids picking up garbage in a ditch along teh road," Gov. Doug Burgum  told reporters at a Mandan news conference.

Protest camp evacuations 'going rather smoothly'

Feb 23, 2017
Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

Gov. Doug Burgum saids it appears between 25 and 50 people are left at the Oceti Sakowin protest camp on the Cannonball River.

At its peak, an estimated 10,000 people were at the Dakota Access Pipeline protest camp.

Wednesday (2-22-17) was the deadline for protestors to vacate. Burgum told reporters from his perspective, that process went rather smoothly.

"I think the message got out," Burgum said. "Lots and lots of people left the camp voluntarily."

Deadline day for Dakota Access Pipeline protesters

Feb 22, 2017

Law enforcement will evict the remaining protesters at a North Dakota camp this afternoon. (WEDNESDAY)

thousands of protesters gathered near the Standing Rock reservation over several months hoping to stop the Dakota Access pipeline. the pipeline is soon to be completed and spring flooding threatens the camp.

Stuart Perkins is Ojibwe from Minneapolis. He's been at the camp since October and won't leave on his own.

Construction on the Dakota Access oil pipeline could wrap up in March. While the pipeline company still faces legal challenges, it’s fast-tracking the last section of pipe under the Missouri River. Inside Energy’s Amy Sisk recently visited the nearby protest camp that’s on the verge of disappearing.

The state Senate has rejected a bill calling for a study of having state lawmakers undergo cultural competency training.

Originally, the bill required 8 hours of such training. And the sponsors said it was to help legislators understand the Native American culture. But the Senate Government and Veterans Affairs Committee turned it into a study.

"Many of us in the committee felt the intentions for the bill were to give legislators information they may be interested in," said Sen. Shawn Vedaa (R-Velva). "However, to require it is overstepping legislation."

Courtesy ND Legislature

A bill introduced because of Dakota Access Pipeline protesters blocking highways has failed in the House.

The bill said a driver who “unintentionally” causes injury or death to a person intentionally blocking a roadway would not be charged.

One of the measure’s co-sponsors – Rep. Mike Brandenburg (R-Edgeley) -- said things have changed in the state since the Dakota Access protests began. Brandenburg told his House colleagues the protesters have blocked roads, pounded on cars trying to get through, and they're scaring people.

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