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A Fargo construction firm has been fined $7,100 for violating North Dakota’s “One Call” law.

The Public Service Commission agreed to suspend $1,000 of the fine levied against KPH, because it was the first offense. KPH was charged with “failure to conduct excavations in a prudent manner.”

Xcel Energy reported seven separate violations, where 5/8 inch natural gas lines were hit, along with one 2 inch line, and one underground power line. This happened in Fargo.

A New Town construction firm has been fined $4600 for violating North Dakota’s “Call Before You Dig” law.

The owners of the Arrow pipeline filed a complaint against Diamond Willow Energy, LLC for not following that law. Public Service Commission chairman Brian Kroshus said Diamond Willow was working on a project on the Fort Berthold Reservation.

"They (Diamond Willow) failed to contact the Notification Center and provide an excavation notice or location notice before beginning an excavation," Kroshus said.

A Fargo construction firm has been fined $10,000 for violations of North Dakota’s “one call” excavation law.

The Public Service Commission said Xcel Energy filed seven separate complaints against Master Construction for work done in the city of Fargo. PSC Chairman Brian Kroshus said Xcel reported damage to some of its 5/8 inch natural gas lines.

"The complaint is that Master failed to conduct excavation in a careful and prudent manner," Kroshus said.

Dave Thompson / Prairie Public

A Montana construction company has been fined $500 for a violation of North Dakota’s “call before you dig” law.

Energy company Kinder-Morgan filed the complaint against Crawford Construction Company, for work being done in the Bowman area. The complaint alleged Crawford failed to renew a location request prior to the expiration of its original request.

For the past several years, the North Dakota Public Service Commission has received a $10,000 grant to advertise the “one call” program, Call Before You Dig.

The money comes from the federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. And it normally goes toward advertising, mainly to billboards.

But this year, the PSC has applied for $60,000 -- $10,000 for advertising, and $50,000 to cover staff investigation and legal time.

Three companies that were alleged to have violated North Dakota’s “Call-Before-You-Dig” law face fines, under what the Public Service Commission calls an “Order on Default.”

In other words, complaints were filed against the companies in question, and when PSC staff tried to contact them, there was no response.

R. J. Corman Derailment Services was fined $500. Kollman Construction faces a $1000 penalty. And Bulldog Concrete will have to pay $1500. All started digging before making that call.

A representative of Verendrye Electric Cooperative in north central North Dakota wants to see some strengthening of North Dakota’s “call before you dig” law.

"We're worried about a death occurring in these dig-in problems that we've had," said Tom Rafferty, the community relations manager withe Velva-based Verendrye. "Not only that, we're tired of our lines being hit by companies."

Jamestown contractor faces $10,000 in additional fines

Jul 31, 2015

A Jamestown contractor faces another $10,000 in fines for numerous violations of North Dakota’s “Call Before You Dig” law.

A Fargo contractor has been fined $6000 for a violation of North Dakota’s “call before you dig” law,

The Public Service Commission says Robert Gibb and Sons was working near Arnegard, installing a water line, when an 8-inch refined fuels pipeline belonging to St. Paul-based Cenex Harvest States was damaged.

"The estimated amount of damages is between $533,000 and $613,000," said Commissioner Brian Kalk. "This is a very large dollar amount."

A Jamestown construction company faces a number of fines for allegedly violating North Dakota’s “call before you dig” law.

The Public Service Commission’s staff is proposing $60,000 in fines for Northwest Excavating. Many of the violations took place in and around Ross, North Dakota.

"This is, by far, the largest we've ever seen," said Commission chairman Brian Kalk. "It's unprecedented."

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