WHY? - Philosophical Discussions About Everyday Life | Prairie Public Broadcasting

WHY? - Philosophical Discussions About Everyday Life

Second Sunday of each month, at 5:00pm CT
  • Hosted by Jack Russell Weinstein

Join us each month as we engage in philosophical discussions about the most common-place topics with host Jack Russell Weinstein, professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religion at the University of North Dakota. He is the director of The Institute for Philosophy in Public Life.

Ways to Connect

WHY? - “NCAA and its Universities”

Dec 9, 2012

Why? Philosophical Discussions About Everyday Life - Episode 51

WHY? - The Public Philosophy Experiment

Nov 9, 2012

"Our fiftieth episode:
The Public Philosophy Experiment"

Guest Clay Jenkinson interviews host
Jack Russell Weinstein

What allows us to make moral demands on other people? How important are relationships in ethical decision-making and why should people act ethically in the first place? Join WHY?’s host Jack Russell Weinstein and his guest Yale professor Stephen Darwall, as they ask these and your questions during an important exploration into the very foundations of morality.
 

WHY? Philosophical Discussions About Everyday Life, with Jack Russell Weinstein

Stefanie Rocknak is an extraordinary sculptor. She is also an accomplished philosopher. How do the two vocations relate? Does philosophy help or hinder her creative process and how important is theory to the practice of making art? Join WHY as we look into the artistic mind and ask about the process of taking ideas and making them physically real.


 

“WHY? Goes to China” part 5

Aug 23, 2012

Thursday August 23 – “The View from a Private High School,” our final episode of “WHY? Goes to China” with Jack Russell Weinstein. Is Chinese education a mindless brainwashing free of critical thinking or is it a modern, pragmatic, well-rounded experience preparing world leaders for the future? Is it a single-monolithic entity treating all citizens alike, or is it more like America where people can choose their own way? Join WHY? and our guest Dr.

Tuesday, August 21 – Hear It Now is pre-empted for our next episode of “WHY? Goes to China.” Host Jack Russell Weinstein visits with Catherine Gao and Sheryl Jiang, students in their early twenties, studying at a major university, and ready to take on the world. How does it feel to be the hope of a nation, the first generation to experience economic security and freedom of movement? Join WHY? as we ask what it’s like to grow up amidst the fastest changes in Chinese history.

Wednesday , August 15– “Music without Borders,” is our next episode of “Why Goes to China.”Music crosses cultures, but how about the messages it imparts? How do you get an audience to dance, laugh, or even think, when you sing to them in a different language? And what if the music that one person thinks of as a relaxing party-soundtrack is actually regarded as dangerous and revolutionary? Join WHY?

WHY? - “Environmentalism without Protest”

Aug 13, 2012

Monday, August 13 – Part two of five in our series “Why Goes to China.” Today’s episode, with host Jack Russell Weinstein, is called“Environmentalism without Protest.” In the United States, when we think of environmentalism we thing of Greenpeace, demonstrations, and boycotts. But what would environmentalism look like without protests? How can people be inspired to change their ways without petitions and social pressure, and how do you clean up a massive, industrial, over-polluted nation where food safety is a neglected concern? Join WHY?

WHY Goes to China, Part One.

Confucian philosophy plays an important role in the Chinese family, but what role does it play in politics? Chinese is a traditional society, but modern China is built on a break from the past. China holds dearly to its own past, but is experiencing more change than ever before. Join us for a discussion about how tradition works in a changing China and the importance of cities in moral life. This interview was recorded at The American Cultural Center at The University of Shanghai for Science and Technology before a live audience.

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