Dakota Datebook | Prairie Public Broadcasting

Dakota Datebook

6:42 am, 8:42 am, 3:50 pm*, 5:44 pm, and 7:50 pm* CT
  • Hosted by Prairie Public

Sitting Bull to Phil Jackson, cattle to prairie dogs, knoefla to lefse. Dakota Datebook radio features air weekdays at 6:42 am, 8:42 am, 3:50 pm*, 5:44 pm, and 7:50 pm* CT on Prairie Public. Find the 2003-2017 archives here.

*These airtimes during Main Street may vary.

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Dakota Datebook is generously funded by the North Dakota Humanities Council, a nonprofit, independent state partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the program do not necessarily reflect those of the North Dakota Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

The Bismarck High School debate team was on a roll in the spring of 1932 as they competed for the state championship. Under the direction of Miss Pearl Bryant, Junior Birdzell, Lloyd Ode, and Frances Cox represented the club.

 

May is National Historic Preservation Month. Today, we share another story of a North Dakota addition to the National Register of Historic Places.

 

The city of Bismarck had a strong female, Catholic presence from its very early days, as five sisters first arrived in Bismarck in 1878 to open St. Mary’s Academy and Boarding School. This educational venture extended out from Bismarck into western North Dakota as time went by. In the 1880s, more Sisters from St. Benedict’s came to Bismarck to establish the first hospital in Dakota Territory, eventually developing into St. Alexius Hospital. Then in 1944, 140 Sisters from St. Benedict’s volunteered to begin a new monastic community in Bismarck. The first Motherhouse for this community was borrowed from the diocese, but it soon became crowded.  

1987 Legislature

May 12, 2021

 

The 1987 North Dakota Legislative session was historic. Democrats, who already controlled most state offices and the congressional delegation, won control of the North Dakota Senate for the first time. In the Minot-area District 5 Senate race, Democrat Larry Schoenwald beat Republican Mike Timm by a mere 5 votes. That led to a legal fight that went to the state Supreme Court, with plaintiffs arguing that  over 29 voters cast ballots in the wrong district, but the court ruled that only the Legislature can decide contested elections. The ruling handed victory, and control of the Senate to the Democrats, giving them  27 seats to 26. Republicans still controlled the House, 61 to 45.

May is National Historic Preservation Month. Today, we continue a look at Grand Forks schools on the National Register of Historic Places.

Between 1949 and 1965, Grand Forks added a number of new schools. These schools drew on the skills of local architects and marked the progression of the budding population. Theodore Wells and Myron Denbrook designed some of these schools and some later additions.

 

Automobiles were still relatively new in 1911, and with them came accidents, caused by the new technology, changing lifestyles, and even the landscape. In one instance that year, a newspaper reported that Charles McCloskey of Sentinel Butte had escaped more serious injuries when the car he was in "turned turtle," pinning him underneath. He had another occupant in the car, who was thrown clear and was able to help him escape from his predicament.

Steamboats

May 7, 2021

 

In 1832, the Yellow Stone set a record voyage up the Missouri River by reaching Fort Union, on the border of present-day Montana and North Dakota.


In 1837, the St. Peters spread a deadly wave of smallpox as it traveled the Missouri River. The epidemic all but destroyed the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara people.

 

May is National Historic Preservation Month. So today, we share another story of North Dakota additions to the National Register of Historic Places. 

Due to population growth following World War II, the need arose for more schools in Grand Forks. The new schools constructed between 1949 and 1965 were in the mid-century style. Showcasing flat roofs, rows of windows, brick and steel construction, and using greenspace, these schools drew on the skills of local architects and marked the progression of the budding population. 

 

Mail order catalogs are nothing new. They have been a staple of Americana for well over a century. Perhaps the most famous is the Sears catalog.  Starting in 1888, Sears, Roebuck and Company, has sold an amazing array of items, from coal stoves to video games, power tools to ready-to-assemble homes. Yes, homes!

 

May is National Historic Preservation Month. Today, we highlight a North Dakota property on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

A full page on a May evening edition of a 1910 Fargo Forum and Daily Republican was dedicated to local news. These news shorts included North Dakota Kernels, a popular compilation of short reports from local communities across the state. They included humor, local boosterism and news. 

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