Local Stories

Bismarck, ND – Travel agents in North Dakota say they're optimistic that commercial air travel eventually will climb again.

Dickinson travel agency owner Craig Steve says some people will be leery of flying, but others will gain confidence from increased security measures. He says he's worried about too much government intervention in the airline industry.

Fargo, ND – North Dakota State University will hold a public forum "Perspectives: Attack on America" to discuss the implications of last week's terrorist attacks on the United States.

The forum will start at noon, Wednesday September 19, and be held in the Memorial Union Gallery. Panel members will share their expertise on terrorism.

Panel members will include NDSU professors Robert Wood, associate professor and chair of political science, and John Helgeland, professor of religion and history.

    Bismarck, ND – Most North Dakota Farmers Union members who were in Washington, D.C. last week to lobby for a new farm bill returned home via bus.

    But Dale Enerson of Stanley got home another way.

    "I got a plane ticket and got out of Baltimore Saturday afternoon and got back to Minot Saturday night."

    Enerson was scheduled to return home Wednesday -- but the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington disrupted air service. He says most of the other Farmers Union members chartered a bus to get back to North Dakota.

    Bismarck, ND – North Dakota's Housing Finance Agency is preparing another bond issue -- to supply mortgage money for first-time home buyers.

    Pat Fricke is the agency's director:

    "We have had very good demand for our home mortgage finance program. A lot of first-time homebuyers have been purchasing homes. Our loan demand is on a pace for 100-million dollars in loan volumes for the year. And it is the time of the year where we're now needing to replenish our supply of funds for this fall and going into next winter."

    Bismarck, ND – Boost -- then buckle. That's the message of a statewide campaign that kicked off today (Tuesday) encouraging the use of automobile booster seats for smaller children.

    Carol Holzer of the North Dakota Health Department says the campaign will encourage parents to use booster seats -- along with shoulder and lap belts -- for children who are between 40 and 80 pounds and up to 4 feet eight inches tall.

    Holzer says booster seats should be considered part of the transition in child safety restraints.

    Bismarck, ND – The state Industrial Commission has voted to release a preliminary study of breathing problems among children in Coal Country.

    The study is a work-in-progress -- in that the results need to be subjected to a peer-review before being finalized. The Commission had been asked to release the preliminary study -- and Governor Hoeven was agreeable to that....

    Bismarck, ND – Low-income North Dakota families who signed up for the state's fuel assistance program will see a rebate on last winter's heating costs.

    The state Department of Human Services is distributing one-point-four million dollars in rebates to more than 14-thousand households. The refunds are part of a federal program that helps poor families pay high heating bills. It's called the "Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program" -- and Ron Knutson is the director:

    Bismarck, ND – North Dakota Congressman Earl Pomeroy says Americans have a lot to discuss after last week's terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, D.C. And he wants to listen.

    This week Pomeroy is hosting a series of "community conversations" to talk about the terrorist attacks.

    Fargo, ND – This year is the 58th anniversary of National Farm Safety Week and the Farm Safety Just 4 Kids Program is encouraging all Americans to put special emphasis on farm safety.

    This year's theme is "Kids are Number One in 2001."

    The mission of Farm Safety 4 Just Kids is to promote a safe farm environmentto prevent health hazards, injuries, and fatalities to children and youth.

    Fargo, ND – North Dakota Governor John Hoeven is thanking North Dakotans for their many expressions of generosity and concern in the wake of last week's terrorist attacks on New York and Washington. He says New York Governor George Pataki is requesting that people who want to help donate to the newly established New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund.

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    News from NPR

    An official from Toronto has called Amazon's search for the second headquarters "the Olympics of the corporate world."

    It's a unique situation of its kind and scale. Typically, cities and states vie for factories or offices behind the scenes. This time, Amazon's public solicitation of bids from essentially all major metropolitan areas in North America has prompted reporters and analysts across the continent to run their own odds on potential winners.

    What's at stake?

    A semitrailer pulls up, full of rice, water, clothes, medicine, biscuits.

    Aid workers hand out the supplies to thousands of anxious, impatient and hungry refugees.

    The scene is chaotic — and aid groups say that's how it has been for the past few weeks. Over 400,000 Rohingya refugees have fled government violence in Myanmar — where they are a Muslim minority — for Bangladesh. They are straining the capacity of aid agencies on the ground and of the Bangladesh government. And more refugees arrive each day.

    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

    ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

    Geoff Bennett covers the White House for NPR, and he joins us now from New York, where he's among a small group of reporters getting a firsthand look at President Trump's debut at the U.N. Hi, Geoff.

    Iraqi authorities have moved a group of more than 1,300 foreign women and children — the family members of suspected ISIS fighters — and a refugee agency is raising the alarm about their precarious situation and the specter of retribution.

    "The families had been held in a camp in Kurdish-controlled territory while Iraq figures out what to do with them," NPR's Jane Arraf reports.

    For the past nine days, Nancy Schneider has circled the date on her calendar, pinned up on the wall in her kitchen. She's tracking how long she and her husband have been without power since Hurricane Irma hit Florida.

    Last Monday, two-thirds of the state — more than 6.5 million customers — were without power. Crews have worked aggressively since then to restore as many homes and businesses as possible but, more than a week after the storm came ashore, around 400,000 people are still without power.

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    Main Street

    Equifax Leak ~ Tick-Borne Illness ~ MN Film and TV Board ~ Nerd Walk

    Monday, September 18 – What does the Equifax information leak mean for North Dakotans? Here to discuss that issue is attorney general Wayne Stenehjem. ~~~ Harvest Public Media reports on a fatal tick-borne illness. ~~~ Troy Parkinson from the Minnesota Film and TV Board is speaking today at Minnesota State University Moorhead on how independent film producers can be encouraged to bring productions to this region. ~~~ A 10-part, 18-hour history of the Vietnam War Is currently airing Sunday...

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