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World War I

  • On this date in 1915, the big news in North Dakota was the opening of the state fair. The event garnered page one headlines in newspapers across the state. Thousands of visitors were expected to arrive in Grand Forks in caravans of automobiles and on special state fair trains. The first day of the fair was a smashing success, blessed with perfect weather. Organizers predicted it would be the best and most successful state fair ever presented.
  • When war broke out in Europe in 1914, President Wilson announced that the United States would remain neutral. Most Americans supported this policy. The country did not want to become embroiled in a foreign war. Wilson was reelected in 1914, running on his slogan, “He Kept Us Out of War.” But public opinion gradually shifted against Germany, and Wilson asked Congress for a declaration of war in April 1917. He stated that “The world must be made safe for democracy.”
  • No matter how mighty your locomotive is, it will need a bridge to cross a river. As a result, there are hundreds of railroad bridges scattered across the state of North Dakota. One very significant bridge is the High Line Bridge near Valley City.
  • The year was 1918, and the United States was heavily involved in the Great War -- World War One. To feed soldiers overseas, federal and state governments set limitations on the amount of certain foods Americans could eat at home. For example, North Dakotans had meatless Tuesdays. However, on this date, North Dakota’s food administrator Dr. E. F. Ladd changed that by announcing that all restrictions on meat would be lifted for 30 days.
  • Anti-German sentiment ran high not only in the U.S. but also in Canada during the First World War. In some Canadian cities, full-fledged riots broke out.…
  • On this date in 1917, the Hope Pioneer ran picture of a check on the front page. The check was in the amount of $21.25. It was made out to the American…
  • The Great War came to an end at eleven a.m. on the eleventh day of the eleventh month. But while the fighting was over, it wasn’t really the end of the…
  • On November 11, 1918, church bells rang out across the United States and, indeed, across Canada and all of Europe. The war to end all wars was over. The…
  • On this date in 1919, the Weekly Times-Record of Valley City noted that coming home wasn’t always easy for returning veterans. Newsreels showed joyous…
  • By this date in 1919, World War I had ended. The armistice was signed the previous year, and it was time to move on. Americans were anxious to get on with…